Each year, the Council on Competitiveness hosts the National Competitiveness Forum (NCF): a two-day, C-Suite forum to examine America’s competitiveness standing, and present the opportunities and challenges for U.S. innovation, growth and productivity. The conversations that happen at NCF – both on and off stage – will define where the United States stands today and what we will face in the future. In 2017, the Council gathered over 200 leaders for a day of important dialogue to better understand the current state of the economy and the policies and practices that will move our nation forward. We released the 2017 Clarion Call, a policy guide to drive productivity, revive growth, and generate the good-paying jobs Americans need. The Council highlighted both the strengths and weaknesses of American competitiveness, and included a report card on American talent, technology, investment and infrastructure. 

In 2018, the NCF will continue to tackle these issues, as well as explore the Council’s new intiatives, which focus on competitiveness issues in innovation and talent regionally and nationwide. This event will further stimulate discussion and propel new ideas about maximizing American competitiveness under the new Administration, providing a practical policy roadmap in a time of increasing partisanship. The forum will serve as an opportunity to learn, discuss, and contribute to creating a pro-growth agenda in which companies compete and Americans prosper. By joining our event along with more than 200 other C-suite level leaders, your voice will join our important call to action.

About the Council on Competitiveness

In a time of ever accelerating technological change and business transformation, the Council on Competitiveness shapes policies and runs programs to jump-start productivity and grow America’s economy. The Council’s membership is diverse and nonpartisan, representing the major sectors of the economy- CEOs, university presidents, labor leaders and national lab directors.

Together, we work to ensure U.S. prosperity by advancing a pro-growth policy agenda in Washington, D.C., and then we take action ourselves convening program initiatives across the country aimed at creating public-private partnerships where new technologies are born. These member-led initiatives are shaped around the areas of innovation frontiers, CTO policy advocacy, advanced computing, and energy manufacturing.

The roots of the Council trace back to 1986 during the Reagan era Commission on Industrial Competitiveness, chaired by Hewlett-Packard CEO John Young. At the end of the Commission’s work, Young created the private sector U.S. Council on Competitiveness. At the time, U.S. competitiveness was being challenged by the rise of international competition from countries such as Japan and Germany. While the country names may have changed, today’s threats to our economy have only grown through globalization. Today’s competition is a race to see who will innovate and develop key technologies in artificial intelligence (AI), The Internet of Things (TIoT) and 3D printing, to name a few. Future prosperity and an increased standard of living is in the balance.